Tony Duquette

Tony Duquette

The American Tony Duquette is an artist and designer known and admired for his colorful and vibrant style and has been accepted by many as the American Design icon, from his discovery in 1941 to his death in 1999. He left behind an artistic heritage that animates fantasy and mobilizes the imagination.

Elsie de Wolfe met Duquette when he was helping her with designing her house in Beverly Hills and their friendship blossomed, with Wolfe helping the designer with his career, seeing him reach global fame and acclamation with her support and patronage.

Tony Duquette was the first American artist to be honored with a one-man exhibition show at the Pavillon de Marson Hall in Louvre Museum in Paris in 1951. The Neo-Baroque works of the designer were chosen by the Louvre to represent the mid-20th century decorative arts.

In the early years of his career, Duquette's work attracted the attention of Vincente Minnelli, one of the most important film directors of the time, who then invited Duquette to join the film crew to create extraordinary costume and decor designs. Duquette also made artistic contributions to numerous Fred Astaire musicals and MGM studios - Arthur Feed productions, among which are Ziegfeld Follies, Yolanda, The Thief and Kismet.